Kids’ bikes for 2005

11th October: here’s the best – and worst? – children’s bikes soon to be in shops near you. it’s a news report from the Interbike trade show held in Las Vegas.
http://www.bikebiz.co.uk/daily-news/article.php?id=4760

Kids' bikes for 2005

11th October: here’s the best – and worst? – children’s bikes soon to be in shops near you. it’s a news report from the Interbike trade show held in Las Vegas.
http://www.bikebiz.co.uk/daily-news/article.php?id=4760

Don’t super-size transport schemes says CTC

Don’t super-size transport schemes says CTC

CTC has joined an alliance of environmental groups to publish a report that examines why small-scale measures to improve local transport are so often overlooked in favour of big infrastructure projects in the appraisal of transport schemes.

The report, Valuing the small: Counting the benefits, asks why the Government’s recommended appraisal methodology regularly undermines measures like safe routes to schools, 20mph zones and initiatives to improve cycling; it recommends that all proposals should be made to answer the simple question – will this increase or reduce our dependency on the car?

8th October: CTC has joined an alliance of environmental groups to publish a report that examines why small-scale measures to improve local transport are so often overlooked in favour of big infrastructure projects in the appraisal of transport schemes. The report, Valuing the small: Counting the benefits, asks why the Government’s recommended appraisal methodology regularly undermines measures like safe routes to schools, 20mph zones and initiatives to improve cycling; it recommends that all proposals should be made to answer the simple question – will this increase or reduce our dependency on the car? Roger Geffen, CTC’s Campaigns and Policy Manager, said: “The tendency to ‘super-size’s transport schemes by opting for the largest, most expensive projects leads to highly effective, but smaller value-for-money measures being overlooked. For example, research shows that cycle training encourages people to make over twice as many trips by bike and to cycle all year round – all for a relatively modest amount of investment.”
http://www.ctc.org.uk

Don't super-size transport schemes says CTC

Don’t super-size transport schemes says CTC

CTC has joined an alliance of environmental groups to publish a report that examines why small-scale measures to improve local transport are so often overlooked in favour of big infrastructure projects in the appraisal of transport schemes.

The report, Valuing the small: Counting the benefits, asks why the Government’s recommended appraisal methodology regularly undermines measures like safe routes to schools, 20mph zones and initiatives to improve cycling; it recommends that all proposals should be made to answer the simple question – will this increase or reduce our dependency on the car?

8th October: CTC has joined an alliance of environmental groups to publish a report that examines why small-scale measures to improve local transport are so often overlooked in favour of big infrastructure projects in the appraisal of transport schemes. The report, Valuing the small: Counting the benefits, asks why the Government’s recommended appraisal methodology regularly undermines measures like safe routes to schools, 20mph zones and initiatives to improve cycling; it recommends that all proposals should be made to answer the simple question – will this increase or reduce our dependency on the car? Roger Geffen, CTC’s Campaigns and Policy Manager, said: “The tendency to ‘super-size’s transport schemes by opting for the largest, most expensive projects leads to highly effective, but smaller value-for-money measures being overlooked. For example, research shows that cycle training encourages people to make over twice as many trips by bike and to cycle all year round – all for a relatively modest amount of investment.”
http://www.ctc.org.uk

NCSB wants government departments to work together to promote cycling

5th October: The National Cycling Strategy Board argues for ‘joined up government’ in a report presented to the Department for Transport and other government departments.

Copy text:
The report, Bike for the Future, is flagged as a strategic plan to get “more people cycling, more safely, more often.” The plan focusses on the 40 percent of car trips which are less than three miles, and could easily be done by bike. “The benefits would be enormous, both for individuals and society as a whole: less congestion, pollution and obesity, and better health,” said NCSB chair, Philip Darnton. The Board recommends that government departments such as health, education, and culture, media and sport should work more closely together to oversee the funding and management of new investment in cycling. “The aim is to capitalise on the benefits not just for transport but for a range of key government programmes – including the recently announced initiative from the Prime Minister on global warming,” said Darnton. The strategic action plan is to be presented to ministers shortly. “It will hopefully lead to a new and much better structure for the promotion of cycling by the government,” said Darnton. Other members of the NCSB include John Grimshaw MBE, director and chief engineer of Sustrans; journalist Christian Wolmar; and Chris Boardman MBE, former professional cyclist.
http://www.nationalcyclingstrategy.org.uk/vbulletin229/upload/showthread.php?t=352